THE BRAWLERS

THE BRAWLERS

Words By Jay Riggio

Words By Jay Riggio

Recently I was approached by a group of professional and amateur skateboarders who were greatly confused and saddened by their behavior while participating in various acts of violence.  Being the compassionate and extremely empathetic man I am, I gave them each a free psychological consultation.  Actually, you might feel more comfortable referring to me as Dr. Riggio for the remainder of this article. Sit down on my leather sectional, kick off your shoes and be prepared to watch their unconscious minds scrambled, diced and reassembled. 

DJ CHAVEZ
DJ: “Matt Mumford, Lauren Mollica, Jamie Reyes, and I were in Denver to do a demo. There’s was this big party afterwards. I came outside to find Jamie Reyes getting shit talked to her about being a girl skateboarder by some jock. He mumbles some shit as he walks off. Jamie takes off her shoe and throws it at the dude, hitting him in the back of the head. The dude rolls up to Jamie with a clenched fist like he’s gonna punch her. I’m all, ‘What are you doing? You’re not gonna punch a girl.’  He’s like, ‘I’ll fucking punch that bitch.”   ‘What, you want to take her fuckin’ part?’  I’m like if you want to fight me, let’s do this.’

Dr. Riggio: 
Here is where Mr. Chavez makes a conscious decision to put himself in harms way to defend the honor of Jamie Reyes, even though she clearly had provoked the incident. DJ obviously possesses a deep-seated need to love and to be loved. My assessment is he is dealing with issues of abandonment. 

DJ: DJ continues, “He keeps backing up.  And I’m stupid enough to follow this 200-pound jock. I didn’t realize that the corner he was leading me to had nine of his friends waiting for me. I’m like’ “fuck this!”. So I grab him by shirt and I deck him in the nose. Now all ten of these dudes are beating the fuck out of me. One of the guys has the audacity to fuckin’ grab me by my eyeballs from the back and he’s fish hooking me, trying to pop my eyeballs out of my skull.  Some kid goes into the bar and tells Mumford.  So Matt grabs our team manager, Andy and he’s wasted.  They come out and Andy is so wasted, that he ran up, tripped over his leg, and ate shit right next to me.  That took about three or four of them off me off because they started beating on him. So Matt gets me and pulls me up. This pro ho type chick we were with was freaking out saying, “Stop beating up my friends!”. This tiny little girl, steps in between us with a can of mace.  She’s like, “I said stop!’ and sprays the biggest dude.  Suddenly his anger turns into a fucking whimpering cry for Mommy.  His face turns flush red, like he’s devastated.  Then the girl proceeds to mace all of this dude’s friends at the same time.

Dr. Riggio: 
As a young child, DJ ate glass, thinking it was rock candy. According to DJ, he not only felt zero pain, his bowl movement looked liked a chocolate rave, littered with fantastical, sparkly glitter. The ‘Pro Ho’ represents DJ’s mother, whom comes to his aide. It’s interesting that in DJ’s story a woman both starts the violence and ends the violence. Clearly DJ has an unresolved Oedipal conflict with his mother. NEXT!

DJ Chavez Melon Grab. Photo: Sean Peterson

DJ Chavez Melon Grab. Photo: Sean Peterson

BRIAN SUMNER
I had gone out to this double set with Don Barley, Joe Krolick, Jon Goeman, and a few others. We were about to skate when a bum comes over and starts invading everyones space. He wanted us to give him 20 bucks for jumping the set of stairs on a bike. Someone agreed.  He didn’t even jump the set of stairs, he rode down them and then started really getting angry about his money.  I was eating some candy and waiting for him to leave so I could skate. I asked the guy to chill out and he told me he would beat me up. I just turned to walk away. He comes over to me and starts yelling at me waving his fists. He ran at me while I was taking a drink of a soda and then I ended up stepping back and kicking him to the side and he fell back a few paces. He puts his fists up, runs at me and tells me, ‘that’s it.’ I actually got really bummed because I had both my hands full and wanted to skate. I was just going to try and move around a bit until he got tired. He charged me and I dropped my drink, I looked up and he was right there in my face so I stepped back and threw a punch at his shoulder. He fell on the floor and rolled around a bit and then jumped up to tell me he deserved it and didn’t think I could actually hit him and that he had never been hit like that. I felt really bad, but it was self-defense.

Brian Sumner and Homeless Adversary. Photo: Randome

Brian Sumner and Homeless Adversary. Photo: Randome

Dr. Riggio: 
Here Brian experiences a deep sense of shame and guilt. Guilt is Brian’s unconscious need for punishment. According to Freud, “men are not gentle creatures who want to be loved, and who at the most can defend themselves if they are attacked,” but are, on the contrary, “creatures among whose instinctual endowments is to be reckoned a powerful share of aggressiveness.” Understand and embrace your guilt Brian.

Brian Sumner Nollie Half Cab Heel Flip. Photo: Randome

Brian Sumner Nollie Half Cab Heel Flip. Photo: Randome

DARRELL STANTON
My grandfather is a boxing trainer. He’s been doing it for years and years. He trained Evander Holyfield and Sugar Shane Mosley. He’s trained a lot of top fighters. He got me into boxing when I was a kid. He got me into it for the discipline. I pretty much steer clear of street fights. About a year and a half ago I got into a fight. This guy was talking crap at a party and I let him have it.  It was a little scuffle but I came out on top. Once again I am not a fighter.

Dr. Riggio: 
Darrell makes a conscious effort to let us know he is not a fighter. Though he did fight an individual for “Talking Crap”.  This could be a trait of a passive aggressive.  This passive aggression could be the result of his grandfather’s focus on discipline. If left unresolved these issues could prevent him from loving.

Darrell Stanton Crooks. Photo: Randome.

Darrell Stanton Crooks. Photo: Randome.

TERELL ROBINSON
I was in 10th grade at this time and I had a friend who was a BMXer and one day we were getting out of school and I chased him on his bike and he kicked me in the kidney. I grabbed the seat of his bike and he started to fall over, but I grabbed him so he wouldn’t fall and get hurt.  He jumped off his bike and got in my face. And he’s like, “You disrespected me.” I try to walk past him and he’s all like, “Fuck that fool.’ I’m like ‘I don’t want to fight you, this is dumb.’  He kept talking, so I was like, “Ok.”  I take my backpack off and square up.  He went to punch me and missed, and I just gave him two quick right, lefts.  Then he rushes me and I back up and jump in the air and I come down with a right and I knocked him out.  I got scared for a minute because I literally knocked him out.  He paused for a minute.  I didn’t show it, but inside I was like, ‘Oh my god I just killed this dude.’  The dude finally gets up and his shit’s fucked up, his face is done for. My uncle was asleep.  He’s like, “Why are your knuckles bloody and shit?”  I was like, ‘I’m not bleeding, it was him.’

Dr. Riggio:
Mr. Robinson doesn’t want to hurt this bike riding man, yet he acts on his impulse toward aggression. Terell is first inclined to repress his aggression. It seems that Terell is harboring a sense of guilt over his violent episode with the BMXer. If not acknowledged, Terell could plunge into diverse forms of self-punishment and other self-sabotaging activities.

Terell Robinson. Switch Ollie. Photo: Herman Jimenez

Terell Robinson. Switch Ollie. Photo: Herman Jimenez

TOM KNOX
My band and I had just finished playing in Bakersfield. Me, my two other band mates, and our roadie were enjoying a pizza at a table. A fight between two skin heads broke out right next to us. They crashed into our table, so we jumped up and out of the booth and tried to head toward the exit. Right when we get to the exit, security comes in to break up the fight, but they thought we were the instigators, so they pulled out the pepper spray and batons. I ducked the pepper spray, but my two band mates got hit and couldn’t see. Our roadie got sprayed and was getting hit with the baton. We shoved our way out of the place. By now a full riot was near, I grabbed my band mates and roadie and we headed for the street. I was grabbed from behind. I turned around to be sprayed point blank in the face by pepper spray, I instinctively punched the guy square in the jaw and dropped him, in my blurred vision I was also able to plant my Doc Marten square on his head when he fell. Now we were running down the street. We got around the corner, and there was BPD waiting for us. Guns were drawn and we were put face down on the curb. Now we thought, ‘oh fuck.’ Luckily the owner of the place came to our aid and said we did not do anything other than defend ourselves against the security. And the guy I punched actually was arrested for using pepper spray in a closed environment. He also had a mean gash in his head from my shoe. I guess it was all worth it to see that guy get arrested in the end.

 Dr. Riggio: 
Tom seems to take pride in the fact that he had his boot pressed against his attacker’s face. The attacker represented Tom’s father. “The Father” in Tom’s story represents the ultimate threat to his manhood. In his early childhood perhaps Tom felt as if his father was going to castrate him for his affection for his mother. The threat of castration is incalculable; it affects the whole relationship with his father. As a result Tom unleashes the full wrath of his aggression against his assailant who represents his father.

Tom Knox. Frontside air.Photo: Mike Barden

Tom Knox. Frontside air.
Photo: Mike Barden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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